The Doctors (10)Dr. Georges de BellioIn 1874, de Bellio attended the first exhibition of the impressionists without purchasing anything. Two years later however, during the second exhibition, he didn’t go home empty handed.This is a self-portrait of Renoir that he bought from Victor Choquet during that exhibition of april 1876.
Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Autoportrait, ca.1875. Oil on canvas, 39.1 x 31.7 cm. Williamstown, MA, USA, Sterling & Francine Clark 

The Doctors (10)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
In 1874, de Bellio attended the first exhibition of the impressionists without purchasing anything. Two years later however, during the second exhibition, he didn’t go home empty handed.
This is a self-portrait of Renoir that he bought from Victor Choquet during that exhibition of april 1876.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Autoportrait, ca.1875. Oil on canvas, 39.1 x 31.7 cm. Williamstown, MA, USA, Sterling & Francine Clark 

Reblogged from proleutimpressionists

The Doctors (9)Dr. Georges de BellioDr. de Bellio was interested in the young impressionists’ art before he knew them personally. He had already been buying a few works of Monet and Pissarro when opportunities came along.This is one of the three paintings that Georges de Bellio bought from Berthe Morisot during the second impressionist exhibition of april 1876.
Berthe Morisot, Percher de blanchisseuse (Hanging the Laundry out to Dry), 1875. Oil on canvas, 33 x 40,6 cm. National Gallery of Art, Washington

The Doctors (9)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
Dr. de Bellio was interested in the young impressionists’ art before he knew them personally. He had already been buying a few works of Monet and Pissarro when opportunities came along.
This is one of the three paintings that Georges de Bellio bought from Berthe Morisot during the second impressionist exhibition of april 1876.

Berthe Morisot, Percher de blanchisseuse (Hanging the Laundry out to Dry), 1875. Oil on canvas, 33 x 40,6 cm. National Gallery of Art, Washington

The Doctors (7)Dr. Georges de BellioMeet the man who was the second owner of the iconic “Impression, soleil levant”.De Bellio never finished his medical studies and officially couldn’t practice medecine in France. Nevertheless, his befriended painters and writers appreciated his help as a homeopathic doctor. As Octave Mirbeau put it: “He’s not a doctor, but he does miracles with pills”.Starting in 1876, he was regularly consulted by Monet, Renoir and Pissarro, prescribed them homeopathic treatments and from time to time even supplied medication. 

The Doctors (7)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
Meet the man who was the second owner of the iconic “Impression, soleil levant”.
De Bellio never finished his medical studies and officially couldn’t practice medecine in France. Nevertheless, his befriended painters and writers appreciated his help as a homeopathic doctor. As Octave Mirbeau put it: “He’s not a doctor, but he does miracles with pills”.
Starting in 1876, he was regularly consulted by Monet, Renoir and Pissarro, prescribed them homeopathic treatments and from time to time even supplied medication. 

Les Docteurs (8)Dr. Georges de BellioThe Impressionist’s second exhibition in April 1876 was barely more successful than the first one in 1874. In a letter to his wife Berthe Morisot, Eugène Manet wrote: “The entire painter clan is in distress. The art shops are overflowing.”De Bellio was spotted at the vernissage and when the exhibition closed, he had bought three works of Morisot (this was one of them) and one Renoir.More would follow.
Berthe Morisot, Au bal, 1875. Oil on canvas, 62 x 52 cm. Musée Marmottan, Paris

Les Docteurs (8)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
The Impressionist’s second exhibition in April 1876 was barely more successful than the first one in 1874. In a letter to his wife Berthe Morisot, Eugène Manet wrote: “The entire painter clan is in distress. The art shops are overflowing.”
De Bellio was spotted at the vernissage and when the exhibition closed, he had bought three works of Morisot (this was one of them) and one Renoir.
More would follow.

Berthe Morisot, Au bal, 1875. Oil on canvas, 62 x 52 cm. Musée Marmottan, Paris

The Doctors (6)Dr. Félix ReyWhen Vincent Van Gogh had cut off his ear and was brought to the Hôtel-Dieu in Arles for treatment on 24 December 1883, the young intern Dr. Félix Rey was on duty. The patient was suffering from blood loss and hallucinations.After 15 days in hospital, Van Gogh returned to his yellow house on the Place Martine. Not much later, he offered this portrait to the young doctor who had shown so much compassion and skill.Rey accepted gracefully, but never liked the portrait at all. It is said his mother used the painting to patch a hole in the chicken-coop, until it was sold to an artist in 1901. 
Vincent Van Gogh, Portrait du docteur Félix Rey (Portrait of doctor Félix Rey), 1889. Oil on canvas, 64 x 53 cm. Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow

The Doctors (6)
Dr. Félix Rey
When Vincent Van Gogh had cut off his ear and was brought to the Hôtel-Dieu in Arles for treatment on 24 December 1883, the young intern Dr. Félix Rey was on duty. The patient was suffering from blood loss and hallucinations.
After 15 days in hospital, Van Gogh returned to his yellow house on the Place Martine. Not much later, he offered this portrait to the young doctor who had shown so much compassion and skill.
Rey accepted gracefully, but never liked the portrait at all. It is said his mother used the painting to patch a hole in the chicken-coop, until it was sold to an artist in 1901. 

Vincent Van Gogh, Portrait du docteur Félix Rey (Portrait of doctor Félix Rey), 1889. Oil on canvas, 64 x 53 cm. Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow

The Doctors (5)Dr. Paul GachetDr. Gachet’s son, Paul Gachet Junior kept alive the memory of his father and (with his sister) took care of his vast art collection. In 1949 they donated part of the collection to the French state.In 1903, Paul Gachet Junior made this portrait of his father. He signed it as Louis Van Ryssel, after his father, who used Paul Van Ryssel for artist name. 
Louis Van Ryssel, Portrait du docteur Gachet écrivant (Dr. Paul Gachet in Medical Garb), 1903. Watercolor and colored pencil, 64 x 48.4 cm, arched at top. Musée du Louvre, Paris

The Doctors (5)
Dr. Paul Gachet
Dr. Gachet’s son, Paul Gachet Junior kept alive the memory of his father and (with his sister) took care of his vast art collection. In 1949 they donated part of the collection to the French state.
In 1903, Paul Gachet Junior made this portrait of his father. He signed it as Louis Van Ryssel, after his father, who used Paul Van Ryssel for artist name. 

Louis Van Ryssel, Portrait du docteur Gachet écrivant (Dr. Paul Gachet in Medical Garb), 1903. Watercolor and colored pencil, 64 x 48.4 cm, arched at top. Musée du Louvre, Paris

The Doctors (4)
Dr. Paul Gachet
In 1873, Cézanne works in Auvers-sur-Oise and painted his famous Modern Olympia at the home of Dr. Gachet. The doctor was one of Cézanne’s first admirers and bought this work immediately. He lent it to the first Impressionists’ exhibition in 1874, where the press and the public were appalled by it.

Some time later, Dr. Gachet made copies of the Modern Olympia, one in pen-and-ink and this one in oil. He signed the copies with his artist name: Paul Van Ryssel. (Ryssel was the Flemish name for Lille, his town of birth in the north of France).

Paul Cézanne, Une moderne Olympia (A modern Olympia), 1873-74. Oil on canvas, 46 x 55 cm. Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Gift of Paul Gachet.
Paul Van Ryssel, Une moderne Olympia, une copie d’après Cézanne (A modern Olympia, Copy after Cézanne), unknown date. Oil on canvas, 45.5 x 55 cm. Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Gift of Paul Gachet.

The Doctors (3)Dr. Paul GachetNorbert Gœneutte was an impressionist painter and engraver whom Paul Gachet probably met in 1889 or earlier. He treated him for tuberculosis after he had settled in Auvers-sur-Oise, in a house not far from the doctor’s. Eventually, Gœneutte dedicated this portrait to him. Already in 1892, Dr. Gachet donated the painting to the Musée du Luxembourg at the request of the French Minister of Fine Arts, who probably had seen it in the Salon of the “Societé Nationale des Beaux-Arts”.
Norbert Goeneutte, Le docteur Paul Gachet (Dr. Paul Gachet), 1891. Oil on panel, 35 x 26.7 cm. Musée d’Orsay, Paris

The Doctors (3)
Dr. Paul Gachet
Norbert Gœneutte was an impressionist painter and engraver whom Paul Gachet probably met in 1889 or earlier. He treated him for tuberculosis after he had settled in Auvers-sur-Oise, in a house not far from the doctor’s. Eventually, Gœneutte dedicated this portrait to him. Already in 1892, Dr. Gachet donated the painting to the Musée du Luxembourg at the request of the French Minister of Fine Arts, who probably had seen it in the Salon of the “Societé Nationale des Beaux-Arts”.

Norbert Goeneutte, Le docteur Paul Gachet (Dr. Paul Gachet), 1891. Oil on panel, 35 x 26.7 cm. Musée d’Orsay, Paris

The Doctors (2)Dr. Paul GachetThe most priceless portraits of Dr. Gachet must be the two alternative versions that Van Gogh painted in June 1890, only one month before his death.Van Gogh was only one of the impressive list of Gachet’s painter-patients. Look at their names: Cézanne, Corot, Daubigny, Daumier, Dupré, Geoffroy, Armand Guillaumin, Manet, Oudinot, Pissarro and his family, Renoir and Van Gogh.Dr. Gachet acquired a considerable number of paintings, drawings and etches from his famous patients. Only very few people ever got access to his vast collection during his lifetime and many years after. This portrait was part of the donation made by Gachet’s children to the French State in 1949. The alternative version was sold at Christie’s in New York on May 15, 1990 for a then record breaking price of $82,500,000.
Vincent Van Gogh, Portrait du docteur Paul Gachet (Portrait of Doctor Paul Gachet), 1890. Oil on canvas, 68.2 x 57 cm. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

The Doctors (2)
Dr. Paul Gachet
The most priceless portraits of Dr. Gachet must be the two alternative versions that Van Gogh painted in June 1890, only one month before his death.
Van Gogh was only one of the impressive list of Gachet’s painter-patients. Look at their names: Cézanne, Corot, Daubigny, Daumier, Dupré, Geoffroy, Armand Guillaumin, Manet, Oudinot, Pissarro and his family, Renoir and Van Gogh.
Dr. Gachet acquired a considerable number of paintings, drawings and etches from his famous patients. Only very few people ever got access to his vast collection during his lifetime and many years after.
This portrait was part of the donation made by Gachet’s children to the French State in 1949. The alternative version was sold at Christie’s in New York on May 15, 1990 for a then record breaking price of $82,500,000.

Vincent Van Gogh, Portrait du docteur Paul Gachet (Portrait of Doctor Paul Gachet), 1890. Oil on canvas, 68.2 x 57 cm. Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

The Doctors (1)We all need to see a doctor once in a while. So did Monet, Van Gogh and their colleagues. But some of their doctors gradually played bigger roles in their lives. Let’s explore.Paul Gachet, doctor and patron of the artsDr. Paul Gachet was perhaps the most famous of these doctors. He is well-known of course as Van Gogh’s physician during the last period of his life in Auvers-sur-Oise. Gachet must have loved being painted, etched, drawn, sculpted and photographed a lot, given the number of portraits of himself that he kept in his famous art collection that we are about to highlight. Some of them famous to very famous. But let’s start with this caricature in his collection. 
Charles Léandre, Caricature of Dr. Paul Gachet, c.1887-88. Graphite on white paper, 20 x 14 cm. Musée du Louvre, Paris. Gift of Paul Gachet Jr.Léandre was a French caricaturist and painter (1862-1934).

The Doctors (1)
We all need to see a doctor once in a while. So did Monet, Van Gogh and their colleagues. But some of their doctors gradually played bigger roles in their lives. Let’s explore.
Paul Gachet, doctor and patron of the arts
Dr. Paul Gachet was perhaps the most famous of these doctors. He is well-known of course as Van Gogh’s physician during the last period of his life in Auvers-sur-Oise.
Gachet must have loved being painted, etched, drawn, sculpted and photographed a lot, given the number of portraits of himself that he kept in his famous art collection that we are about to highlight. Some of them famous to very famous. But let’s start with this caricature in his collection. 

Charles Léandre, Caricature of Dr. Paul Gachet, c.1887-88. Graphite on white paper, 20 x 14 cm. Musée du Louvre, Paris. Gift of Paul Gachet Jr.
Léandre was a French caricaturist and painter (1862-1934).