The Doctors (17)Dr. Georges de BellioWe shouldn’t be surprised that many art dealers were very interested in de Bellio’s treasures, but he was not on the market to sell.After his death, his daughter Victorine inherited a major collection of the impressionist masters and other works. One could fill a small museum with his 143 paintings, 10 pastels, 133 watercolors and drawings and 170 posters by Chéret and Toulouse-Lautrec. It didn’t take long before Victorine and her husband, Eugène Donop de Monchy, were contacted by art dealers.André Weil, for instance, offered 280,000 francs for “The Europe Bridge”, that de Bellio had bought directly from Monet for only 300 francs. It is one of many offers that the couple refused.But part of the collection did get dispersed around the world, as was the case for this “Garden of Les Maturins at Pontoise”, one of de Bellio’s 11 Pissaros.
Camille Pissarro, Le Jardin des Mathurins, Pontoise (The Garden of Les Mathurins at Pontoise), 1876. Oil on canvas, 112.7 x 165.4 cm. The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City

The Doctors (17)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
We shouldn’t be surprised that many art dealers were very interested in de Bellio’s treasures, but he was not on the market to sell.
After his death, his daughter Victorine inherited a major collection of the impressionist masters and other works. One could fill a small museum with his 143 paintings, 10 pastels, 133 watercolors and drawings and 170 posters by Chéret and Toulouse-Lautrec. It didn’t take long before Victorine and her husband, Eugène Donop de Monchy, were contacted by art dealers.
André Weil, for instance, offered 280,000 francs for “The Europe Bridge”, that de Bellio had bought directly from Monet for only 300 francs. It is one of many offers that the couple refused.
But part of the collection did get dispersed around the world, as was the case for this “Garden of Les Maturins at Pontoise”, one of de Bellio’s 11 Pissaros.

Camille Pissarro, Le Jardin des Mathurins, Pontoise (The Garden of Les Mathurins at Pontoise), 1876. Oil on canvas, 112.7 x 165.4 cm. The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City

The Doctors (16)Dr. Georges de BellioFor painters like Monet, Renoir and Pissarro, Georges de Bellio was a friend an protector. In their times of need, they could rely upon him for help. From time to time, for instance, he paid Monet in advance for unfinished paintings or even for works that hadn’t even been started.Buying and selling works, de Bellio compiled one of the most important collections of (then) modern french art, comparable in number and quality with those of the most important museums.He pledged to Monet that he would never sell his most important works. And he didn’t.
Nicolae Grigorescu, Portrait de (of) Georges de Bellio, 1876. Oil on canvas, 71 x 54 cm. Musée Marmottan Monet

The Doctors (16)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
For painters like Monet, Renoir and Pissarro, Georges de Bellio was a friend an protector. In their times of need, they could rely upon him for help. From time to time, for instance, he paid Monet in advance for unfinished paintings or even for works that hadn’t even been started.
Buying and selling works, de Bellio compiled one of the most important collections of (then) modern french art, comparable in number and quality with those of the most important museums.
He pledged to Monet that he would never sell his most important works. And he didn’t.

Nicolae Grigorescu, Portrait de (of) Georges de Bellio, 1876. Oil on canvas, 71 x 54 cm. Musée Marmottan Monet

The Doctors (15)Dr. Georges de BellioTowards the end of his life, de Bellio was dreaming of building his own gallery in which he would be able to exhibit the best works of his collection. In this imaginary little museum, there would have been room for 28 Monets, 10 Pissarros,  8 Renoirs, 4 Cézannes, 5 Guillaumins, 6 Manets, 2 Sisleys, 3 Morisots, 1 Gonzalèz and this small but exquisite Degas.
Edgar Degas, La repasseuse (The Laundress), 1873. Oil on canvas, 25,1 x 19,4 cm. Norton Simon Art Foundation, Pasadena 

The Doctors (15)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
Towards the end of his life, de Bellio was dreaming of building his own gallery in which he would be able to exhibit the best works of his collection. In this imaginary little museum, there would have been room for 28 Monets, 10 Pissarros,  8 Renoirs, 4 Cézannes, 5 Guillaumins, 6 Manets, 2 Sisleys, 3 Morisots, 1 Gonzalèz and this small but exquisite Degas.

Edgar Degas, La repasseuse (The Laundress), 1873. Oil on canvas, 25,1 x 19,4 cm. Norton Simon Art Foundation, Pasadena 

The Doctors (14)Dr. Georges de Bellio"The Europe Bridge" was one of 28 works of Monet that Georges de Bellio had selected for the gallery he wanted to create towards the end of his life. He had bought it directly from Monet in March 1877 for only 300 francs. Three years later, the art dealer Georges Petit advised Monet not to sell so cheap anymore. De Bellio was not amused.
Claude Monet, Le Pont de l’Europe, Gare Saint-Lazare (The Europe Bridge), 1877. Oil on canvas, 84 x 71 cm. Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris

The Doctors (14)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
"The Europe Bridge" was one of 28 works of Monet that Georges de Bellio had selected for the gallery he wanted to create towards the end of his life. He had bought it directly from Monet in March 1877 for only 300 francs. Three years later, the art dealer Georges Petit advised Monet not to sell so cheap anymore. De Bellio was not amused.

Claude Monet, Le Pont de l’Europe, Gare Saint-Lazare (The Europe Bridge), 1877. Oil on canvas, 84 x 71 cm. Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris

The Doctors (13)Dr. Georges de BellioTowards the end of his life, de Bellio dreamed of his own gallery where he would be able to show his collection. With this goal in mind he bought and sold a lot of paintings. He told Monet that he wanted to select “specimens of the different phases or work methods of your work”.For this imaginary museum, de Bellio kept 28 wonderful works of Monet. One of them was this “Impression. Sunrise”, that gave its name to the Impressionist movement.
Claude Monet, Impression, soleil levant (Impression. Sunrise), 1872. Oil on canvas, 48 x 63 cm. Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris

The Doctors (13)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
Towards the end of his life, de Bellio dreamed of his own gallery where he would be able to show his collection. With this goal in mind he bought and sold a lot of paintings. He told Monet that he wanted to select “specimens of the different phases or work methods of your work”.
For this imaginary museum, de Bellio kept 28 wonderful works of Monet. One of them was this “Impression. Sunrise”, that gave its name to the Impressionist movement.

Claude Monet, Impression, soleil levant (Impression. Sunrise), 1872. Oil on canvas, 48 x 63 cm. Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris

The Doctors (12)Dr. Georges de BellioWhen in 1876 local physicians in Argenteuil suggested surgery for Claude Monet’s wife (Camille Doncieux), both Claude and Camille were very upset. Monet wanted a second opinion from Georges de Bellio, a practitioner of homeopathy, not really a doctor. We will never know if it was his advise or Camille’s fear that kept her from heaving the surgery.Anyway, she died three years later, very likely of a form of pelvic cancer.
Claude Monet, Camille ou la femme à la robe verte (The Woman in the Green Dress), 1866. Oil on canvas,  231 × 151 cm. Bremen, Kunstalle Bremen

The Doctors (12)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
When in 1876 local physicians in Argenteuil suggested surgery for Claude Monet’s wife (Camille Doncieux), both Claude and Camille were very upset. Monet wanted a second opinion from Georges de Bellio, a practitioner of homeopathy, not really a doctor. We will never know if it was his advise or Camille’s fear that kept her from heaving the surgery.
Anyway, she died three years later, very likely of a form of pelvic cancer.

Claude Monet, Camille ou la femme à la robe verte (The Woman in the Green Dress), 1866. Oil on canvas,  231 × 151 cm. Bremen, Kunstalle Bremen

Reblogged from proleutimpressionists

The Doctors (11)Dr. Georges de BellioDr. de Bellio was an early admirer of the impressionists. In January 1874, two years before he met its painter in person, he bought this work in the Hôtel de ventes on the Rue Drouot. It had been put on sale by the (still) prosperous art collector Ernest Hoschedé and became de Bellio’s first Monet.
Claude Monet, Les bords de la Seine à Argentueil (The Banks of the Seine at Argenteuil), 1872. Oil on canvas, 53 x 71 cm. Private collection.

The Doctors (11)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
Dr. de Bellio was an early admirer of the impressionists. In January 1874, two years before he met its painter in person, he bought this work in the Hôtel de ventes on the Rue Drouot. It had been put on sale by the (still) prosperous art collector Ernest Hoschedé and became de Bellio’s first Monet.

Claude Monet, Les bords de la Seine à Argentueil (The Banks of the Seine at Argenteuil), 1872. Oil on canvas, 53 x 71 cm. Private collection.

The Doctors (10)Dr. Georges de BellioIn 1874, de Bellio attended the first exhibition of the impressionists without purchasing anything. Two years later however, during the second exhibition, he didn’t go home empty handed.This is a self-portrait of Renoir that he bought from Victor Choquet during that exhibition of april 1876.
Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Autoportrait, ca.1875. Oil on canvas, 39.1 x 31.7 cm. Williamstown, MA, USA, Sterling & Francine Clark 

The Doctors (10)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
In 1874, de Bellio attended the first exhibition of the impressionists without purchasing anything. Two years later however, during the second exhibition, he didn’t go home empty handed.
This is a self-portrait of Renoir that he bought from Victor Choquet during that exhibition of april 1876.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Autoportrait, ca.1875. Oil on canvas, 39.1 x 31.7 cm. Williamstown, MA, USA, Sterling & Francine Clark 

Reblogged from proleutimpressionists

The Doctors (9)Dr. Georges de BellioDr. de Bellio was interested in the young impressionists’ art before he knew them personally. He had already been buying a few works of Monet and Pissarro when opportunities came along.This is one of the three paintings that Georges de Bellio bought from Berthe Morisot during the second impressionist exhibition of april 1876.
Berthe Morisot, Percher de blanchisseuse (Hanging the Laundry out to Dry), 1875. Oil on canvas, 33 x 40,6 cm. National Gallery of Art, Washington

The Doctors (9)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
Dr. de Bellio was interested in the young impressionists’ art before he knew them personally. He had already been buying a few works of Monet and Pissarro when opportunities came along.
This is one of the three paintings that Georges de Bellio bought from Berthe Morisot during the second impressionist exhibition of april 1876.

Berthe Morisot, Percher de blanchisseuse (Hanging the Laundry out to Dry), 1875. Oil on canvas, 33 x 40,6 cm. National Gallery of Art, Washington

The Doctors (8)Dr. Georges de BellioThe Impressionist’s second exhibition in April 1876 was barely more successful than the first one in 1874. In a letter to his wife Berthe Morisot, Eugène Manet wrote: “The entire painter clan is in distress. The art shops are overflowing.”De Bellio was spotted at the vernissage and when the exhibition closed, he had bought three works of Morisot (this was one of them) and one Renoir.More would follow.
Berthe Morisot, Au bal, 1875. Oil on canvas, 62 x 52 cm. Musée Marmottan, Paris

The Doctors (8)
Dr. Georges de Bellio
The Impressionist’s second exhibition in April 1876 was barely more successful than the first one in 1874. In a letter to his wife Berthe Morisot, Eugène Manet wrote: “The entire painter clan is in distress. The art shops are overflowing.”
De Bellio was spotted at the vernissage and when the exhibition closed, he had bought three works of Morisot (this was one of them) and one Renoir.
More would follow.

Berthe Morisot, Au bal, 1875. Oil on canvas, 62 x 52 cm. Musée Marmottan, Paris